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Hair Loss Treatment and Remedies

Hair loss

A healthy adult loses at least 100 hairs a day from his head, so only excessive hair loss above this level is abnormal, says Dr. Warwick Carter in his book The Complete Family Medical Guide. Hair may be lost in small patches (alopecia areata), large areas, or there may be diffuse loss of hair from all over the head.

The most common type of hair loss is male-pattern baldness. In male-pattern baldness, hair loss typically results in a receding hairline and baldness on the top of the head. Men who start losing their hair at an early age tend to develop more extensive baldness. There is a strong hereditary tendency in this condition.

Diffuse hair loss, when the person notices large quantities of hair coming out in their brush or comb, is a common and distressing problem, but must be severe before anyone else notices the problem. Alopecia areata, on the other hand, causes a small area of the scalp to be completely hairless. The area starts as just a tiny patch, but may slowly spread to result in hairless patches a few centimeters across. In the worst case, the entire scalp may be affected (alopecia totalis).

A number of things can cause hair loss. A common cause is stress and anxiety. For example, about 3 or 4 months after an illness or a major surgery, you may suddenly lose a large amount of hair. This hair loss is related to the stress of the illness and is temporary.

Hormonal problems may cause hair loss. If your thyroid gland is overactive or underactive, your hair may fall out. This hair loss usually can be helped by treatment of the thyroid disease. Hair loss may occur if male or female hormones, known as androgens and estrogens, are out of balance. Correcting the hormone imbalance may stop your hair loss.

Many women notice hair loss about 3 months after they've had a baby. This loss is also related to hormones. During pregnancy, high levels of certain hormones cause the body to keep hair that would normally fall out. When the hormones return to pre-pregnancy levels, that hair falls out and the normal cycle of growth and loss starts again.

Some medicines can cause hair loss. This type of hair loss improves when you stop taking the medicine. Medicines that can cause hair loss include blood thinners (also called anticoagulants), medicines used for gout, medicines used in chemotherapy to treat cancer, vitamin A (if too much is taken), birth control pills and antidepressants.

Certain infections can cause hair loss. Children may have hair loss caused by a fungal infection of the scalp. The infection is easily treated with antifungal medicines.

Finally, hair loss may occur as part of an underlying disease, such as lupus or diabetes. Since hair loss may be an early sign of a disease, it is important to find the cause so that it can be treated.


Herbal Hair Loss Remedies That Offer Hope

Article by: Richard Mitchell

Herbs hold an obvious appeal for many people because they support the body's natural healing mechanisms to target the cause of the problem, as opposed to merely tackling the symptoms. It would be wrong to present herbal hair loss remedies as a miracle solution for all sufferers there is however growing evidence to support the view that some herbal remedies offer real hope to many people.

Let's examine the case for some of the more popular remedies to determine if they're worth trying.

Ginkgo biloba: This popular herb is thought to improve blood circulation to the brain and skin. Herbalists believe that the increased flow of blood to the brain area delivers more nutrients to the hair follicles thus promoting hair regrowth. The recommended dose is 120-160mg of dry extract each day spread over three doses.

Green tea (Camellia sinesis): It is thought that catechins found in green tea may inhibit the enzyme 5-alpha-reductase that converts testosterone into hair-unfriendly DHT. It is therefore believed to be effective in preventing and treating male pattern type baldness. You should drink several cups of green tea each day or take it in capsule form as instructed by the manufacturer.

He Shou Wu (Polygonum multiflorum): Also known as Fo-Ti, this Chinese herb has traditionally been used to reduce hair loss. It is found in many commercial preparations, or in tea and capsule form.

Pygeum (Pygeum africanum): Derived from the bark of an evergreen, it works in a similar way to green tea. It is widely used to treat prostate problems and male pattern baldness. Users should take 60-500mg per day in pill or capsule form.

Saw palmetto (Seranoa repens): This is the current treatment of choice for many men due to its ability to protect the prostate, slow hair loss and encourage hair regrowth. It forms the core element of many commercially prepared hair loss treatments but can easily be obtained in its pure form. The recommended dose is a 160mg capsule twice each day, but make sure the ingredients are made from the berry extract not the dried berries themselves.

Stinging nettle (Urtica diocia): This has long been favored as a means of preventing hair loss due to its ability to block the conversion of testosterone into DHT. It can be taken in pill or capsule form with an optimum dose of 50-100mg per day. It is particularly effective when combined with pygeum and saw palmetto.

About The Author
Richard Mitchell is the creator of the www.myhairlossadvisor.com website that provides information and guidance to those suffering from premature hair loss.

OTHER RESOURCES:

Hair Loss Treatment
Solutions for hair loss, thinning and balding hair for men and women.

Hair Loss and Hair Loss Treatment
Hair loss treatment using combination medications; nonsurgical hair loss treatment.

Hair Club: Hair Loss and Hair Replacement
Provides proven hair loss solutions, including state-of-the art, non-surgical hair replacement; the gold standard in hair transplantation; and, hair therapy programs that incorporate FDA-approved hair re-growth agents.

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