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How to Use the Seated Rows Machine


This piece of equipment is often referred to by different names. Seated rows, seated cable rows, pulley rows or seated pulley rows are what it is most commonly known as. It works the back muscles, primarily the "lats" (latissimus dorsi) which are the larger back muscles on either side of the back. It also works the "traps" (trapezius) located at the upper portion of the back, as well as the rhomboids which are located behind the shoulder area.

Setting up the machine
  • This machine works with a cable motion and does not require any setting up. However, it is important to ensure you are seated correctly for optimal benefit and to reduce strain and injury.
  • Set the desired weight load before getting on the machine.
How to use
  • Sit facing the machine and place your feet flat against the footpads provided.
  • Bend the knees slightly.
  • Start by bending the torso forward and grab onto the handlebars, balancing the load between right and left arm.
  • Keeping your head up and eyes looking forward, so that you donít hunch too far forward, take a deep breath in and as you exhale straighten the back and pull the elbows back as far as possible.
  • Hold for a count of one before returning to the starting position.
  • Keep your butt on the machine at all times and focus on using the back muscles to move the weight load.
  • If you are swinging backwards and forwards excessively, decrease the weight load until you have developed adequate strength in that region.
  • Do not jerk when you pull the weight back. It is important to keep your form upright and focus excessively on the upper back.

Variations
This machine generally has a carebena clip which snaps on and off to allow you to change the handlebars. Changing the handlebars will allow you to focus on various regions of the back muscles and target the muscle at different angles.

Author: Dimi Ingle.
Copyright 2009: Remedium. This article may not be copied, in whole or in part, without the written consent of Remedium.

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